summer’s end

Before summer goes leaping into fall, as it can tend to do in these parts, I want to offer homage to it and to those who tend its landscape.

In early June, before the sun had reached its northernmost point in the sky and summer’s arrival in this hemisphere had not quite yet been heralded, I was lamenting in “Obesity, oh wait a minute“, about the “collective abdication” of societal nourishment due to the blurry division between culture and corporation.  This was written in response to my learning about a local community sacrificing its citizenry for some petty reward from Arby’s–the fast food roast beef chain.  The insidious mutiny of our taste buds and natural hungers by corporations who have invested deeply in behavioral psychology, flavor and gene manipulation and marketing in order to usurp our birthright of health, always makes me feel pretty yukky .   

susan fowler's friendship garden

susan fowler’s friendship garden

I quoted Dr. David Katz who asked, “If you know it’s important to control your weight and attend to your health, but almost everything in your environment and your culture conspires against such efforts- how responsible are you, personally?  Are you truly personally irresponsible if you go with the prevailing flow?“   Julie, my dear friend and a wonderful teacher, provided an apt My Plate haiku in response–see below.

When one is swirling about in the prevailing flow, it is hard to either remember or to imagine a different current of possibility.  For context, I remind that my work entails helping those who have not just gone with the flow, but who are drowning in it.   While much about  our modern food situation lurks in shadow, thankfully the enlightening sun continues on its ecliptic journey along the celestial sphere in spite of ourselves.  When it reaches the right ascension: 6 hours; declination: 23.5 degrees on June 21st–the longest day of the year, the light shifts, the air warms, and we are blessed with the advent of summer. This is the season that offers the opportunity to paddle over to the river bank and to rest for a while.

At the solstice, the denizens of summer appear.  Having spent months in preparation for this precious moment, this is when the sowers and reapers take to the fields, playing midwife to the earth’s fertile bounty that the warm sun beckons forth.   One must move slowly and sit quietly to see them.  Like little gnomes, hunched low to the ground or up in the trees, they are busy with their work, often in the early hours of the day. They tend to be weary and shy of the noise and bustle of the big cities and crowded highways.   Sometimes they commune better with their animals than with people.

But, they are gentle and caring folk, and eventually they step through the veil of the misty morning and come forth with their beautiful harvest–raspberries, blueberries, currants, peaches and plums, big bunches of leafy chard, heads of tender bibb lettuce, peas and beans, luscious tomatoes, beets and carrots pulled from the dirt, melons of many varieties, eggs laid from happy chickens, cheeses curdled from the milk of frolicking goats and tiny bundles of fragrant herbs.

As if awakening from a midsummer’s night dream, when we behold these offerings we are a bit uncertain at first about what is real–are we truly enamored of the jackass or are we brought to our senses by being reminded of what is truly beautiful and deeply nourishing?  Can we actually claim this amazing food for ourselves and for our children as well?  May we feel more resolute to decry the fodder that misrepresents itself by masquerading as food?  It is possible.

Summertime provides me with many wonderful examples that creating new paradigms of food and feeding exist.  Two urban, youth focused programs include the Student Produce Project run by my friends at the Capital District Community Gardens; and the magical school-based Friendship Garden fertilized by many years of hard work and the amazing love of another dear friend, Susan Fowler.  Susan is also a wonderful teacher and a whole lot more.  With her corps of elementary students in her heart and at her side tending the crops, she has been an early crusader in the school gardening movement.

CDCG Produce Project

CDCG Produce Project

front side gmo display

front side gmo display

Farmer’s markets also always inspire.  This summer, a day trip led me to the Saugerties Farmer’s Market in the beautiful Hudson Valley.  There, beside the wonderful assemblage of growers, bakers and jelly makers I came upon an educational and artistic display about the health effects of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in food.  Afterward, I kept wondering how did science meet such creative expression, so I traced my way to the work of the person responsible, Claudia McNulty. Claudia is a painter, designer, sculptor and seemingly, environmental activist as well.  Her work is beautiful and thought-provoking.  Claudia has provided some links to very important information through her Corn Porn GMO project.  These include the Seralini GMO Rat Study and a video interview with an MIT scientist on the effects of the increased use of the herbicide RoundUp required by GMO crops.  To appreciate our current health crises, it is essential to understand the influence of GMOs.

But, the earth tenders who most personally influenced my own summer, were my friends Justine and Brian Denison, and their crew, the farmers at Denison Farm, providers of my Community Supported Agriculture share, who not only grew, but also delivered weekly, the amazing produce that graced my own table and fed my family.  There is a film, Radical Roots: Reawakening the Local Food Movement, by Patricia Lane, that features their farm.  It was something captured in this story, that really colored my thoughts  and inspired me through these long sunny days.  I hope it may do the same for you.

So, to all of summer’s tenders who work so hard as stewards of the land and take care to feed us all,  I offer deep and profound thanks, and hope that the fall provides some well deserved rest.  And to summer itself, it is always sad to see you go, but thanks for giving respite from our busy year and for illuminating the ways we can re-route the prevailing flow that permits corporate control of our health and environment.

In health, Elyn

As always, likes, shares, comments, subscriptions, haikus, plates and watering of my blog are welcomed with opened arms.

PS.  I am realizing I would be remiss, if I did not mention (my pretend) new friend, Tess Beatrice and her unbelievably conceived and beautifully presented Sow Good Bakery‘s delicious morsels.  I met Tess while at the Saugerties Farmer’s Market where I also got a hula hoop!  All of the offerings are gluten-free, refined sugar-free, sometimes raw confections laced with unusual spices and topped with tender flower petals.  They were truly amazing, gorgeous and quite unique.  Worth checking out to see if she will be your friend too.

Susan's My Plate

Susan M’s Fall My Plate

My Plate Haiku

It is easier                                                                                                                                             

to reprimand the sinner

than change the system.

By, Julie 

5 thoughts on “summer’s end

  1. Summer is my favorite season, for all the beautiful farming and gardening and fresh, delicious reasons you mentioned. I remember driving my daughter and few others to high school several years ago, and picking up one such lovely young Denison daughter. Traveling with her, learning about the farm throughout the seasons was a gift to me and my other high school aged passengers. Thank you for them, and for all of us who attempt, in some form or another, to plant the seeds, nurture them, and offer their fruits to our families and friends. So much goodness starts right there with intention. Thank you for your wisdom and the beauty of your writing, Elyn.

    Like

  2. Thank you for this tender reminder to stop and see the wonder of the season’s bounty and the dedicated, and often,special people who tend it. A trip to the Farmer’s market these days is truly a trip to wonderland. How is it possible to wrestle such piles of colorful bounty form the land and sell it for really pennies when you imagine what went into it. It seems we are eating pure, bright love!

    Like

  3. yes, so true. my day at the FarmAid concert also showed how hard these small scale farmers are working, not only growing and raising our food, but doing incredible advocacy and sustainability work as well. thanks for your beautiful comment.

    Like

  4. Pingback: The Nutritionist’s Dilema | Claudia McNulty, Artist and Decorative Painte

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s